Radiosonde

A radiosonde (Sonde is French and German for probe) is a battery-powered telemetry instrument package carried into the atmosphere usually by a weather balloon that measures various atmospheric parameters and transmits them by radio to a ground receiver. Radiosondes may operate at a radio frequency of 403 MHz or 1680 MHz. A radiosonde whose position is tracked as it ascends to give wind speed and direction information is called a rawinsonde (“radar wind -sonde”).[1][2] Most radiosondes have radar reflectors and are technically rawinsondes. A radiosonde that is dropped from an airplane and falls, rather than being carried by a balloon is called a dropsonde. Radiosondes are an essential source of meteorological data, and hundreds are launched all over the world daily.

Modern radiosondes measure or calculate the following variables:

GRAW’s latest state-of-the-art radiosonde,  the DFM-09, is currently the smallest and lightest synoptic radiosonde available on the market today. The DFM-09 has dimensions of 200mmx42mmx60mm and weighs just 90 grams (Ready to Fly)! The DFM-09 has already proven itself to many customers worldwide – delivering excellent perform-ance, ease of use, and high reliability.